FujiFilm Classic Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Porta 400

Fujifilm cameras are renowned across the photography world for their film simulation modes. In-camera effects applied to JPEGS make them appear similar to traditional film. Another impressive feature Fujifilm cameras have is their ability to manipulate these simulation modes further. By doing so, it is possible to render effects similar to legitimate traditional film stocks. So besides posting my film simulation recipes here, I will also share those that replicate old films used in decades past. The first recipe is Porta 400. One of Kodak’s most popular and widely used films.FujiFilm Classic Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Porta 400

1. Overview

Introduced by Kodak in 1998, the Porta family didn’t make it into the game until just before the death of film.

Kodak Porta is a daylight-balanced colour negative film intended for professional use. Portraiture and wedding photography were the primary targets for Porta.

Available in 3 speeds, 160, 400, and 800 ISO, the 160 and 400. 160 and 400 were also sold in “natural colour” and “vivid colour” variations.

Since its introduction in 1998, Kodaks Porta has had two updates in 2010 and 2011. These updates included a finer grain, improved sharpness and naturally rendered skin tones.

2. Positive Observations

The recipe simulates the Porta film to an acceptable standard. It renders the best results when used in strong, natural daylight.

Besides the colour, the other settings leave the images with sharpness and noisiness true to the original film.

3. Negative Observations

Kodak Porta is a film with greener hues than most other films. However, this recipe overshoots the mark and leaves the images looking saturated by the colour.

Much like the original film was intended for outdoor use, this recipe is no different. Due to its Kelvin balance, the simulation is only suitable for outdoor use in bright natural light.

4. Where/How To Use

Originally, Porta was intended for use at weddings and portrait shoots. However, I wouldn’t recommend it for the former application. On the other hand, it is suitable for portraiture, especially in scenarios where the photographer wants to create a washed-out, retro, even dreamy aesthetic.

Other potential applications include street photography and photoshoots in nature.

The most important thing to remember when using this simulation is that it is strictly for outdoor use in strong natural light.

5. The Recipe

  • Film Simulation: Classic Chrome
  • Grain Effect: Strong / Small
  • Colour Chrome Effect: Strong
  • Colour Chrome FX Blue: Weak
  • White Balance: 5200k, Red +1, Blue -6
  • Dynamic Range: 400
  • Tone Curve: S -2, H 0
  • Colour: +2
  • Sharpness: -2
  • High ISO NR: -4
  • Clarity: -2

If you don’t already own a FujiFilm camera and would like to achieve results like these with no post-processing involved, I recommend purchasing the FujiFilm XT-4. UK readers click here. US readers click here.

This recipe was taken from Fuji X Weekly. To see more classic film simulations for FujiFilm Cameras click here.

6. Conclusion

If If you are a fan of the classic Porta 400 film stock, I am sure you will enjoy using this recipe.

It is not in line with my personal tastes. But we are all different, and that what’s makes being creative so much fun. We all have something different to bring to the table, with a unique approach to our own work.

If you like the look of the sample images displayed on this page, why not program the recipe into your own Fujifilm and take the time to experiment to see if you like it.

If you get some great results, please be sure to tag #shuttergangofficial and #shuttergang.com on IG for a chance to be featured on the feed!

What do you think of the sample images? Do you have any recommendations on how to improve it? Have you experimented with the simulation and have your feedback? Please let us know your thoughts in the comment section below!

FujiFilm Classic Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Porta 400

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If you would like to see the full list of FujiFilm recipes shuttergang has to offer click here.

David Davis
David Davishttps://shuttergang.com
Hi, My name is Dave, and I am passionate about photography. I am currently travelling to document the world's most interesting people and places. I have started this blog to share these incredible sights and experiences with you, including all the knowledge I gain as a photographer/videographer along the way. If you share a passion for street, documentary, and travel photography, join the mailing list and stay up to date with the latest posts and resources direct from the field.

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